Archive for the ‘Stuff other people make’ Category

Behind the scenes

(source: The Skull Illusion)
Not sure of the facts behind this picture. Rigor mortis seems to have set in on the subject. An interesting find.

Tom McCathie as Frank

Here are a few stills from the 48-Hour Film Project shoot I was a part of a few weeks ago. And what as awesome and exhausting 48 hours it was! With our genre of Black Comedy, along with the character Frank, a magnet, and the line “let me tell you a secret”, this crazy little thing happened!

Saara Lamburg, Tom McCathie and Captain Boots

Gotcha!!

Precious Captain Boots

Saara Lamburg plays Mrs Miranda Von Barrington

Director and Cam Op at work!

The Madman himself!

That blasted cat!

Family Portrait?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I hope you are intrigued enough to see what we got up to! The film, Captain Boots, will be screening along with all the other entries this coming Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday night at cinema Nova, more info here! You should come and check it out!

A well dressed man sits next to his catch

I found this quaint gentleman yesterday. It was hard to make out first, but I realized that they were fish lined up next to him (a little harder again to see in the scan, but they are there). I think I was drawn in by the expression on his face. You can almost see him turn around and nod with satisfaction. He seems so well-dressed for a spot of fishing too.

I feel like there is a story somewhere behind this picture. I like to wonder who it would have been who took the picture too. It doesn’t seem that old, so probably just a lovely little Kodak moment by the river. A family member or a friend perhaps. I would love to know if anyone could hazard a guess at the era of this photograph. I am not much of a good judge on clothes.

I find these candid moments captured in photos much more interesting than stiff portraits. I feel like there is real life and character in there. It was well worth the $1.50 I paid for it! The photo has been enhanced a little in Photoshop, but unfortunately some details were too overexposed to bring out. It looks much crisper in person. You can actually make out some of the details in the fish, and the expression on the man’s face is a bit clearer.

I’ve been hoping to start collecting interesting photographs  (particularly post mortem ones), and that all began today when I picked up a few curious bits and pieces for not very much. I hope to share some of my more interesting pieces.

I have found what I think is a post mortem photograph (for $7, a bargain!). I’ve been studying them quite closely, so I have developed something of an eye for spotting them. In this, there was something about the eyes…

Probable post mortem photograph of a little boy. There is something not quite right about his eyes and positioning in the chair.

The photograph didn’t scan so well, so I have brought up the contrast with Photoshop. It was found tucked away in a box of old photographs at the Chapel St Bazaar in Prahran.

I dearly would love to know more about this photograph, but there is no information on the back. I can only hazard a guess that it looks like very early 20th century (but I could be wrong, if someone could shed some light, I’d be grateful!). The chair seems reasonably modern.  From first glance, the boy seems to be quite healthy. I wonder what it was that led him to his untimely death. It seems that the family have decorated the sitting area with tree fronds. The oriental fan at the bottom right hand corner is curious too. Perhaps it was a souvenir?

The more I look at the photograph, the more haunting it seems. This little boy’s image made it all the way through history, his likeness preserved and finally digitized. Such a wonder is photography.

Victorian era post-mortem family portrait of parents with their deceased daughter. (Source: Wikipedia)

Now that I have shot my latest film, it is never too early to start with the next one. I have been fascinated by post-mortem photography for many years, so it only seems natural to explore it through film. I would love to know the stories of these families.
This photograph is very interesting. You can tell that the young woman is deceased by the stillness. Photographs of that era took a long time to expose, so living people are always ever so blurry. But the dead are completely motionless, crisp and sharp for the photo.

Daniel Henshall as John Bunting in Justin Kurzel’s Snowtown (Photo IFC Films)

I finally got around to watching Snowtown last night, after loads of people had told me to. Perhaps by myself in the dark at night wasn’t the best way to do it though. It was the performance of Daniel Henshall as John Bunting, Australia’s most infamous serial killer, which made it such a gripping and disturbing experience.

I flicked through the special features on the DVD, and I found the original casting clips of several of the characters. I watched Henshall’s and was impressed with his ability to carry the constant threat of violence, and lack of compassion even in audition. It is a chilling performance among many other great performances.

Throughout the film there was hardly a scene in which Henshall isn’t smiling, relishing in his power. The way in which he is shown manipulating all who are around him, and slowly tearing them apart is so much more horrifying for all the pleasure and lack of empathy he shows. He takes Jamie (Lucas Pittaway) to show him the bodies of Gavin and Barry, showing them off to him like trophies. This complete disconnection from the horror of his actions is confronting. He grooms Jamie to be a part of his sadistic, perverted lifestyle almost effortlessly; such is his charisma and ability to manipulate.

It is interesting to note that not once is the audience given a moment to feel sympathy, or a see a weakness in his character. He is positioned to be in control in every scene he is in. He is always loud, opinionated, and dominating in whatever conversation he is in. Yet, underneath his jovial and blokey manner, there is always the threat of violence, and the audience is enthralled, just waiting for him to explode. As the film is based on a true story, and a very well-known one at that, it is always a challenge to bring such infamous characters to life. Henshall creates the perfect portrait of a serial killer, exactly how I would have imagined him.

So now back to our scheduled work…

BLOG TASK 3: (due week12 semester 1)

Given the screenwritingexercises you have been doing the for past few weeks you should by now be experts at discerning a stories central dramatic question, defining character choices and nominating ‘whose film’ it is.

I would like you to take a short film or substantial scene  and analysis it in the following ways:

1. Establish whose story it is?
2. What is the central dramatic question of the short film/scene? When is the question asked? When is the question answered? Is it answered in the positive or the negative? Is it answered at all? How does it (or not) reflect the thematic questions of the scene/short film?
3. What choices does the central character make that defines their journey through he scene/short film?

AND GO!

The vignette above, Cousins comes from the larger piece Coffee and Cigarettes, directed by Jim Jarmusch.  The scene revolves around the relationship between the famous Cate Blanchett, playing herself, and her fictional cousin Shelley.

Although we first meet Cate, waiting for Shelley, it is clear that this is Shelley’s story, as she attempts to reconnect with her cousin, as well as undermine her glamorous lifestyle. The central dramatic question is will Shelley gain the respect of Cate, and fit in with her famous life? Whist, yes, I know I should be trying to find something more ‘practical’, this seemed to be the only conclusion I could find.

The dramatic question is posed right near the start of the scene. Cate doesn’t not remember the name of Shelley’s boyfriend, and has not read any of Shelley’s letters. Shelley attempts to empathise with Cate about the frustrations of the paparazzi and being famous, but is in fact attempting to undermine her. The two women then continue to not connect, with Shelley undermining Cate and refusing to share her boyfriend’s music. Cate gives Shelley a bag of ‘swag’, failing to understand how frustrating her privleges are to those outside the glamour of showbiz. The answer to the question is a resounding no. Whilst Shelley initially tries to copy Cate and be like her when they order coffee, she is reduced to mocking her hand gestures by the end. The two promise to catch up again, but the chances of it happening for a long time are unlikely. It seems that the cousins will not be able to find a common ground.

At the conclusion, Shelley defies Cate after she has left, removing her glamorous fur coat, revealing a T-shirt. She orders a double tequila and lighting another cigarette. She is told she is not allowed to smoke in the lounge, despite doing so earlier with her cousin, again emphasizing the difference in class and lifestyle, and how irreconcilable their worlds are. Curious it is that Jarmusch chose to use Cate in both roles, perhaps hinting that the fame is really the only thing separating them.

Throughout the scene, Shelley is the far more active one, and her major actions are –

  • Offering Cate a cigarette and smoking with her.
  • Attempts to copy Cate whilst ordering coffee.
  • Adds five sugar cubes to her coffee.
  • Admits she has used Cate’s name to get into a club.
  • Confronts Cate about not reading her letters or listening to her boyfriend’s CD.
  • Refuses to share her boyfriend’s CD.
  • Admits she didn’t send a CD after all.
  • Subversively suggests her gift from Cate is swag.
  • Affirms Cate and thanks her, though she is really attempting to undermine her status.
  • Refuses Cate’s offer to go up to her room.
  • Takes off her glamourous coat, orders tequila and takes out a cigarette.
  • Puts away her cigarette.

Through these actions the viewer can trace Shelley’s awe and jealously for Cate, which slowly turns to contempt. She has attempted to fit in with the glamourous lifestyle, talking about her boyfriend’s band, and discussing a club she has been to, but she finds herself ultimately disgusted by the lifestyle: “It’s just funny, don’t you think? When you can’t afford something, it’s like really expensive, but then when you can afford it, it’s like, free. It’s kinda backward, don’t you think?”