Archive for September, 2012

I’ve been doing a fair bit of research into the history of photography in between post-production for My Boy (which is going quite well if I say so myself). As a result, I think I will be shifting the era of my film next year from the 1880’s to around the 1850’s. The photography then interests me more.

I have finally gotten around to putting a name to this particular picture I have always been interested in:

Boulevard du Temple, Paris by Louis Daguerre 1839

Inadvertently, this early photograph by Louis Daguerre was the first photograph of a human being. The exposure time was so long that only the figure getting his boots polished was still enough to expose in the busy street. As exposure times decreased from a staggering 8 hours to 30 minutes and less, photography became a much more accessible medium. I cannot imagine living in a time to see the first photographs. It would surely have been mind-blowing.

It is my intention over the enormous break between uni, that I will follow and replicate the early processes of Daguerre and Joseph Nicéphore Niépce whilst writing, to gain a fuller understanding of how photography came to be. There is a sort of nostalgic pleasure that I have found this year working with film, so I am excited to take yet another step back to a more organic process. I shall eventually share the results. Stay tuned!

And that is a wrap! After an exhausting three days of shooting (and countless days of pre-production), My Boy is finally in the can! I had the absolute pleasure working with some excellent actors, and an amazing crew down near Mornington Peninsula.

Here are a few production stills:

Forbidden Love: Khan Oxenham as James and Emily Milledge as Jen

Happy birthday sweetheart: James and Mother (Janet Watson Kruse)

“Who needs a dolly?”

Shooting in the bedroom

Surprisingly delicious…

“If you’ve got a car, you’ve got a dolly!”

The first couple of days were quite smooth, and I was really happy. Things got a little hairy toward the end of the second day, as we were running late, and had shot around 15oft too much, leaving less than 350ft for the final, most intensive day (nine minutes!). I worked around our stock shortage on the morning of the third day, cutting what I could. It was a truly painful process (hough to its credit, it resulted in a few creative shots). I was rewarded in the evening for my spartan use of stock with absolute knock-out performances from my two lead actors (not to mention my super taleted crew!) and I had the stock left to capture it all perfectly. I cannot wait to see the final scene.
This has been a wonderful, stressful, crazy last few weeks, but I think it was worth it. I gues I will find out how it all looks when I get it back from telecine!

Victorian era post-mortem family portrait of parents with their deceased daughter. (Source: Wikipedia)

Now that I have shot my latest film, it is never too early to start with the next one. I have been fascinated by post-mortem photography for many years, so it only seems natural to explore it through film. I would love to know the stories of these families.
This photograph is very interesting. You can tell that the young woman is deceased by the stillness. Photographs of that era took a long time to expose, so living people are always ever so blurry. But the dead are completely motionless, crisp and sharp for the photo.